Anticipation

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For me, one of the most exciting parts of being a record collector (and, more generally, a music fan) is taking a peek at the upcoming release schedule and counting down the days until my favourite bands release their newest works to the world. It’s one of the reasons why I feel sorry for the folks that are content to go with the flow and listen to whatever Top 40 radio or Spotify curates for them. Even though the process is nearly extinct, there’s a little spark of magic to be found in dropping by your local record store on ‘New Release’ day – it used to be Tuesdays, now it’s Fridays – and exchanging your hard-earned cash for some new musical adventures.

It certainly appears that 2017’s new release schedule will not disappoint me. Over the next few months, a bevy of artists that I greatly admire will be unleashing new records and possibly going on tour to promote them. I can hardly wait; I’m vibrating like my five year old niece on Christmas Eve.

The upcoming releases that I’m most looking forward to are as follows:

Prisoner by Ryan Adams (17-Feb-2017)

ryanadams_prisonerI won’t dispute that, at times, Ryan Adams could have benefitted from an editor to bring coherence to his ramshackle albums. Why put out three half-assed records a year, when you could have put out one lean & mean, 10-track compendium and ruled the musical landscape? Alas, Adams has dialled down his self-medications and grown wiser in recent years. Prisoner will be his first album of original material since his 2014 self-titled record, not counting 2015’s well received but oddly unsatisfying track-by-track remake of Taylor Swift’s 1989. Three years is like three decades by Adams’ standards.  Like all great introspective divorce albums, Prisoner is reportedly fuelled by the breakdown of his marriage to Mandy Moore. Rumours abound that the music is infused with 1980’s touchstones, so presumably Adams is finally conjoining his trademark melancholy with his unabashed Smiths fandom. Song titles like “Do You Still Love Me”, “Doomsday”, “To Be Without You”, and “Breakdown” are a pretty good indication of where his head is at. I pre-ordered this LP online, and I will continue to check my mailbox every night until it arrives.

New Album by Beck (date and title TBD)

beck_dreamsThis record was supposed to come out in the summer of 2016. Singles “Dreams” and “Wow” hit the airwaves, and bounced with an energy that screamed “day-glo festival performance staples”. Yet despite a series of rumoured and subsequently abandoned 2016 release dates, the full album never hit the shelves. We got bits and pieces on various Record Store Days, and nothing but vapours otherwise. It seems like a foregone conclusion that the long-awaited follow-up to Beck’s morose yet achingly beautiful Morning Phase will finally come out in 2017. But I’m trying not to hold my breath waiting for the other shoe to drop from everyone’s favourite funky-guero Scientologist. Beck has always worked in mysterious ways, and he seems to revel in confounding conventional wisdom and his fans’ expectations. But whenever the new album finally drops, expect to see me in the record shop on its day of release to buy it.

Little Fictions by Elbow (3-Feb-2017)

elbow_littlefictionsThe band Elbow makes the kind of music that words like “elegiac” and “majestic” were meant to describe. Their tunes are tailor-made for people who love to revel in wistful British melancholy. It’s unlikely that you’ll ever hear an Elbow song in, say, a beer commercial, but you could very well expect to hear one in an advert for prudent financial planning. Their last album, The Take Off and Landing of Everything, was a minor masterpiece, marrying subtle rhythms and timeless melodies to a widescreen tableau of the struggles and victories of modern life. Fans are expecting more of the same from Little Fictions, despite the departure of Elbow’s long-time drummer, Richard Jupp. Perhaps they will take inspiration from R.E.M. after Bill Berry’s abdication and turn to electronic drum machines as a new source of inspiration. Like the new Ryan Adams record, I am certainly looking forward to having this pre-ordered album finally arrive in my mailbox.

New Album by LCD Soundsystem (date and title TBD)

lcd-soundsystemThe cat came back – they thought he was a goner – the cat came back, he just couldn’t stay away. James Murphy retired his LCD Soundsystem alt-disco project a few years ago with a cathartic performance at Madison Square Garden. Yet, hardly five years on, the band has been reassembled to not only headline various festivals (including this year’s Forecastle festival in Kentucky) but to tour in support of a new album. I’m excited to hear what Murphy and co. have been working on in what one imagines to be a claustrophobic studio stacked to the rafters with analogue synths, vintage drum machines, and sci-fi ephemera. To say the new album has a reputation to live up to somewhat understates the situation. At any rate, I’m eager to learn how LCD Soundsystem picks up on the free-floating existential angst of 2017 and turns it into rousing, rhythmic dance anthems for the homely and disenfranchised.

Risk to Exist by Maximo Park (21-Apr-2017)

maximo_park_risk_existMaximo Park are one of those UK acts that I’ve had a soft spot for ever since the early 2000’s, when I used to get my new-music recommendations from magazines like Q and MOJO. Maximo Park have been making angular, polyrhythmic music since their 2005 debut A Certain Trigger and a clutch of energetic hit singles loudly proclaimed their arrival on the modern rock scene. It’s very difficult to find their albums on this side of the Atlantic, but I had the good fortune to buy 2012’s The National Health on my UK trip last year. God, how I wish those Soho record shops were closer to my home! I recently noticed on a British upcoming releases website that Maximo Park are putting out a new album, called Risk to Exist, in April of this year. Advance word from the band’s publicist suggests the new record is “informed by the dire state of world affairs in 2016 and crumbling political systems”. So, not big Brexit fans, then!  Doubting that it would get a simultaneous release on physical formats outside of the UK, I’ve ordered my copy directly from the band’s merchandising website. And I’m told the LP will be autographed by the band! Not too shabby for 20 quid, including international delivery.

New Album by The National (date and title TBD)

thenationalI try to avoid making blanket declarations like “so-and-so is the best band on the planet”. But I will freely admit that The National have been at or very near the top of my ever-evolving Favourite Bands list since I first heard them back in their Alligator days. There is just something about the way their insular, occasionally miserable, but very inviting and introspective music connects with me – it’s essentially the soundtrack for my endless internal discourses. If I’m ever stranded on a desert isle without a copy of High Violet I will be crushed, even though I’ve long since memorized every musical passage. Last year, lead singer Matt Berninger confirmed that the band has been wrapping up a new album in the studio, presumably for a 2017 release. He describes the sound as “weird, math-y, electronic-y stuff… we’re in the middle of the wilderness, in a rainforest full of really fun noises”. I take that to mean that The National are experimenting with new sounds and textures, but I trust the Dessner Brothers to rein things in enough to make yet another gorgeous desert-island disc for my collection.

Northern Passages by The Sadies (10-Feb-2017)

sadies_northernThe Sadies are something of a Canadian roots-rock institution. Lanky brothers Dallas and Travis Good have been making music with their compadres for over two decades. Sadies records are mainly about atmosphere and texture. Sometimes the music is quiet and thoughtful, other times it’s quick and propulsive, but there is always a palpable sense of multi-dimensional power. Their musicianship is also second-to-none; watching them perform live is like spending the evening at Hot Licks School. I was thrilled to pick up their new album, Northern Passages, at my local record shop yesterday, and even happier to see the glorious Northern Lights adorn the cover. We haven’t had a display quite like that so far this winter, but those green curtains bring back memories of my teenage years, making 3 am trips outside to check on the cows in calving season. Today is Family Day in Alberta, which means that most of us have the day off of work. I’m going to celebrate tonight after playing hockey by coming home, lighting the fireplace down in my man-cave, cracking open a cold malt beverage, and giving my copy of Northern Passages its first spin. Three cheers for Canadiana.

Heartworms by The Shins (10-Mar-2017)

shins_heartwormsIn recent years James Mercer has been splitting his time between the synth-pop duo Broken Bells (with Danger Mouse) and his day job as lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for The Shins. It’s great to see that another Shins record is due for release next month, once again on Mercer’s Aural Apothecary label, suggesting the perfectionist remains in full control of the band’s musical direction. Based on the evidence of first single “Dead Alive”, there hasn’t been a huge shift in musical direction, although perhaps The Shins are growing a little more cross-pollinated by the crystal-clear production and subtle electronic bleeps and bloops of Mercer’s other band. I trust that Heartworms will provide Shins fans with many new earworms to enjoy, either in album form or via their inevitable placement in various Zach Braff movies.

Hot Thoughts by Spoon (17-Mar-2017)

spoon_hot_thoughtsIn my Best of 2016 list, I quietly hoped for a new Divine Fits record in 2017. It doesn’t appear that we will get one, but for a very good reason – singer-guitarist Britt Daniel will be busy launching a new Spoon record instead! Dave Fridmann is apparently back to twiddle the knobs and push the sliders on Hot Thoughts, so I’m not expecting it to sound vastly different to 2014’s excellent They Want My Soul. Spoon records always seem to have an innate ability to push the sparse, rhythmic envelope without devolving into tuneless cacophony. It’s interesting to see that Hot Thoughts will be coming out on Matador Records,  the Austinites original label. Hopefully that doesn’t cause them any distribution headaches, although fans have had to wait weeks or even months to get their hands on vinyl lately from some of the music world’s smaller labels.  Perhaps it would be wise to pre-order this record, just in case they are scarcer than hen’s teeth in the shops.

New Album by The War on Drugs (date and title TBD)

warondrugs

Philadelphia band The War on Drugs turned the indie rock revolution on its head with 2011’s Slave Ambient and 2014’s Lost In The Dream. Both records recast the music of their forefathers (most notably Petty, Dylan, and Springsteen) into the 21st century, giving their songs a uniquely modern, hazy sheen. Lost In The Dream especially pushed the re-invention to new levels, incorporating shimmering keyboards and other thoughtful production touches. And I would be remiss to not to mention the wonderfully engaging songwriting and indelible melodies. The results were a timeless series of songs that flowed into one another, sounding especially great on vinyl (as any Pink Floyd fan can attest). Details of the new record continue to be a closely-guarded secret, but the band’s Instagram account would suggest that they’ve been holed up in the studio, no doubt perfecting something marvellous. If a new record appears in 2017, and lives up to the high standards set by “Touch of Grey”, the War on Drugs’ recent contribution to the excellent Day of the Dead compilation, it could be really special.

As if these epic new releases aren’t enough, here are the upcoming vinyl re-releases that make me giddy with anticipation:

The Unauthorized Biography of Reinhold Messner by Ben Folds Five (24-Mar-2017)

benfolds_reinholdmessnerThis is the album that made me a fan of Ben Folds and his fearlessly rambunctious cohorts for life. I can still remember the day that I bought this CD, at the St. Vital outlet of HMV in Winnipeg, as though it was yesterday. The lady behind the counter gave me a sexy sideways glance that said “you don’t know it yet, but you are going to love this record”. I had heard lead single “Army” on MuchMusic and thought its horn-driven, smart-ass vibe was really cool. Much to my delight, I was completely blown away by the rest of this album as well. Named in honour of the Swiss mountaineer that inspired drummer Darren Jessee’s fake IDs as a teenager, Reinhold Messner is a masterpiece of piano-driven rock. “Don’t Change Your Plans”, “Mess”, “Magic”, “Army”, “Regrets”, and “Jane” all unlocked compositional doors in my mind that I hadn’t previously realized were even there.  I am so thrilled to see this album getting a proper release on vinyl; I plan to enjoy it at outrageous volume in my man-cave.

Wildflowers by Tom Petty (date TBD)

petty_wildflowersAt the time, it was billed as a Tom Petty solo record.  But Mike Campbell, Howie Epstein, Steve Ferrone, and Benmont Tench all appear on the record, so who’s kidding who? Wildflowers might as well be a Heartbreakers record. And what a record it is – Petty at his most stripped back, emotionally naked, and endlessly tuneful. Songs like “You Wreck Me”, “You Don’t Know How It Feels”, “Crawling Back to You”, and the sublime title track will always have a special place in my heart. And the simply gorgeous “Wake Up Time” was the song I woke up to on the fateful day that my BFF chose to irreparably damage our life-affirming friendship. To this day, it’s still my ringtone whenever I set my alarm on holiday. Perhaps that makes me a masochist, but you could do a lot worse than to start your day with those chiming acoustic guitar chords and strings that just seem to hang on the air like fair-weather clouds. “Well if he gets lucky, a boy finds a girl to help him to shoulder the pain in this world”. Indeed, Tom. If the rumours are true, then a two-LP re-release of Wildflowers is in the works for 2017, in accordance with Petty’s original plan for the album. Expect to hear some of those extra tracks in a feature role on this summer’s Heartbreakers tour.

Live at Leeds by The Who (24-Feb-2017?)

who_liveatleedsFor my money, this is the greatest live rock & roll record ever released. Live at Leeds captures The Who at the peak of their performance power, late in their February 1970 tour of England. The original album featured just six frenetic, explosive tracks; it was later augmented by other crowd favourites and a slightly abridged version of the Tommy suite that The Who pummelled their audience with on the same tour. The results are a tour de force of unadorned rock music. Pete Townshend layers his Gibson SG power chords and Roger Daltrey howls in anguish over John Entwistle’s fearless, melodic bass runs and Keith Moon’s incomparable, frantic drums. The vicious ensemble sounds like it’s going to fly apart at any moment, yet a palpable sense of nervous energy miraculously holds the proceedings together. The versions of “Young Man Blues”, “A Quick One, While He’s Away”, and “My Generation” should be required listening for anyone under the age of 30 who’s contemplating starting a band. These hallowed recordings are finally coming back to vinyl in a half-speed mastered 3LP format, and I can hardly wait to pick up my copy. Quick update: February 24th has come and gone, and the release date has been pushed back yet again. I will let you know when I finally hold those magical platters in my expectant hands.

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